Tag Archives: Meduseld yarn

Spring Inspired Rovings

Here at Meduseld we will not be daunted by this latest March snow storm.  We are determined to usher in Spring and its vibrant, cheerful shades.

Charlotte and I have been dying some gorgeous Romney roving in splendid Spring shades and we are delighted with the results!

Romney Roving - "Jetstream"

Romney Roving – “Jetstream”

Brilliant sapphire blue with teals, purple, red coral and green.  So much fun in one roving :)  Here is a closeup:

Romney Roving "Jetstream"

Romney Roving “Jetstream”

You can buy Jetstream in our store here.

Another splendid blend we are calling Copacabana, named after the famous beach in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

Romney Roving "Copacabana"

Romney Roving “Copacabana”

Bright colors of the tropics and Carnival blended into a beach beige background.

Romney Roving "Copacabana"

Romney Roving “Copacabana”

Copacabana is available at this link.

Our third roving is inspired by our dominant Peacock, Beau.  He is best friends with Beauty and Beautiful.  Despite the cool weather, he has already grown his splendid tail for the Spring, and it trying to impress the ladies.

Romney Roving "Beau"

Romney Roving “Beau”

Romney Roving "Beau"

Romney Roving “Beau”

This roving can be found in Meduseld’s store here.

Coming soon – Macaw

Long Island Project Assist Autism Knit-a-Thon – Yarn on Sale!

Meduseld has donated yarn for the 6th Annual Long Island Project Assist Knit-a-thon.  Here is the description from The Village Knitter group on Ravelry.

Sunday, June 8th Knit-a-Thon! Long Island Project Assist will be sponsoring their Sixth Annual Knit-a-Thon at the shop to raise awareness and donations for the developmentally disabled and autistic population they service. Come join us or make a donation directly online. Long Island Project Assist supports the YAI Network and works hard to ensure that people with developmental and learning disabilities have access to the support and services that they need to live productive, independent and healthy lives.

In honor of the event, the two yarns Meduseld has donated will be on sale in the Meduseld store.  They are two of the sport weight Romney yarns in Monet’s Reflection  and  Monet’s Winter Sunset.  Normally $13.50 a skein, they are now only $10.00 each until June 10, 2014, or until stock runs out, whichever occurs first.

If you’d like to donate directly to the Knit-A-Thon, use this link.

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Alpaca Romney Bulky – Back in Stock!

I am thrilled to announce that Meduseld’s Bulky Alpaca Romney is back in stock!  Whew!  This is a highly popular natural brown blend that flies off our shelves.  We have limited production of this yarn since I use the same two fleeces each year to make it – one a natural brown alpaca and the other a natural grey brown Romney ewe.  Their blend yields a luxurious, shiny yarn.

Meduseld's Alpaca Romney Yarn

Meduseld’s Alpaca Romney Yarn

This yarn is so squeezably soft, wonderful for warm winter knits, and perfect for this time of year.  This yarn has no itch factor and is sutable for garments that touch your skin.  For some reason I cannot explain, it is darker this year than last, looking more like a rich dark chocolate.

This year's blend is darker, on left

This year’s blend is darker, on left

 We only have five pounds of this yarn, so supply is again very limited.  Each 250 yard skein weighs approximately 8.7 ounces – over half a pound!  They are $30.00 each, the same price as last year.  You can find them in our store here!

Gratefully,

Patricia

Icicle Shawl Pattern

Meduseld’s Icicle Trim Shawl was very popular at Shenandoah’s Fiber Festival last week, and I received numerous requests for the pattern. As promised, here it is, FREE!

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The shawl is springy and light and the icicle fringe gives it the appearance of winter, or even like dew on a spring morning.  The body of the shawl is knitted and the trim is an easy crochet pattern.

Materials:

2 skeins of Meduseld’s Lace Romney, approximately 500 yards

silver EE (#6) beads

US 6 Knitting needles

US G crochet hook

US 10-13 stainless crochet hook or beading needle

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BODY – Place one stitch on your left knitting needle. Make one YO on right needle and knit the stitch on the left needle. Turn. YO, knit the two stitches. Turn, YO, knit the three stitches.Continue with this pattern until you have 164 rows. Each row will have one stitch more than the row before, and very quickly you’ll have a shawl with large loops at each side from the yarn-overs. Bind off the stitches of the last row keeping the remaining stitch and do not cut the yarn.

ICICLE TRIM – Insert crochet hook into the remaining stitch. Turn the shawl so that the side is up. * SC in first yarn-over loop. Chain three. **SC three stitches, placing a silver bead in each SC (see photos). SC in third chain stitch, Chain two, SC in same yarn-over loop. SC in next yarn-over loop. SC in next yarn over loop, chain three, ** repeat stitches between ** until you reach the tip of the shawl where you create an icicle in all three of the yarn-over loops. Resume from * and finish the other side of the shawl. Bind off and weave in yarn end.

Place a bead on the #10 hook.  Pull yarn through the bead.  This loop forms the next crochet stitch.  Put the G hook through this loop and draw a stich through it to close the stitch.

Place a bead on the #10 hook. Pull yarn through the bead. This loop forms the next crochet stitch. Put the G hook through this loop and draw a stitch through it to complete the stitch.

 

Place three beads this way.  You can see that each is separated by the closing stitch.  Now SC in the third chain stitch, and chain two more to complete the "icicle."

Place three beads this way. You can see that each is separated by the completed single crochet  stitch. Now SC in the third chain stitch, and chain two more to complete the “icicle.”

BLOCK – wash gently with a mild soap and block or lay flat on towel to dry, shaping the shawl.

Special notes: You will have yarn left over. You can make the shawl larger by increasing the number of rows.  Just keep in mind the approximate amount you will need to crochet the edge.

For beading, I use a US #10 stainless crochet hook which is used for making crochet lace. The #10 size is fine enough to go through most of the beads and still has a large enough hook to draw the yarn through. Kate Rabjohns, our expert knitter, uses a #13, which being finer fits through more beads. Note that the hook is smaller though.

Meduseld's Icicle Shawl

Meduseld’s Icicle Shawl

Pattern by Patricia Culver, Meduseld

2013 Shenandoah Valley Fiber Festival

If there could be a theme for this year’s Fiber Festival in Berryville, VA, I think it would be “friends.” 

We saw so many old friends and made so many new ones.  From one moment to the next, there would be lively chatter in the booth, and surprise visitors popping in throughout the day. 

Meduseld's 2013 Booth

Meduseld’s 2013 Booth

It was terrific to meet some of the other vendors that we had not had a chance to meet in previous years.  Kellie Tatem with Lizard Toes where they make awesome drop spindles, Allegra Studnitz with One of Kind making her darling fiber angels and fairies, Connie DeLamater, Andrea Thornock (who in addition to selling wooden yarn cubbies is also a professional singing instructor), and so many more interesting and informative vendors.

I was finally able to meet Kate Blaney with Gourmetstash.com who makes punis for spinning.

Kate Blaney with Gourmetstash

Kate Blaney with Gourmet Stash

Here are some of her punis.

Gourmet Stash Punis

Gourmet Stash Punis

Opposite our booth was Lynn Blake with Mayhem Farm.  In this picture you can see her stunning handmade shawl creations behind her.

Lynn with Mayhem Farm

Lynn Blake with Mayhem Farm

Fiber arts were not the only skills represented.  There were also some woodworkers who had gorgeous works of art.  If you are looking for a present for your spouse for Christmas, you might want to consider one of the wooden pens handmade by Becky and Dave Lloyd of Timber and Whimsy.

Becky and Dave Lloyd of Timber Whimsy

Becky and Dave Lloyd of Timber and Whimsy

Another highly skilled woodworker was Bill Hardy of Turnstyles.  He made exquisite boxes with drawers and hidden drawers, in addition to drop spindles, crochet hooks and even ice cream scoops!   Notice the butterfly box on the left.

Bill Hardy of Turnstyles

Bill Hardy of Turnstyles

We saw familiar faces such as Emily Estrada of the  Fibretown Podcast, and Judi and Clyde DeWitt, the historic bobbin lace makers.  And, we were delighted to have a visit from Sue Groundwater who used to have the locally famous FrogEye Fiber Emporium in Winchester.  Sue gave knitting, spinning, and weaving lessons there for years and has probably instructed half the fiber artists in Winchester.  She taught me to spin and taught our son Gavin to knit.

Patricia Culver, Sue Groundwater and Gavin Culver

Patricia Culver, Sue Groundwater and Gavin Culver

It was fun to watch all the creations worn by Festival attendees.  There were so many shawls and sweaters handmade by their owners.  It was truly eye candy.  Here is one visitor to our booth in a shawl of her own creation.  In addition to being loaded with stunning fall colors, it used up ends and pieces of yarns from other projects. 

Spectacular Shawl Creation

Spectacular Shawl Creation

We also had on hand to give advice our knitting expert Kate Rabjohns in one of her diaphanous beaded creations in alpaca.

Kate Rabjohns

Kate Rabjohns

Even Miss Clark County was there with her mother.

Miss Clark County 2013

Miss Clark County 2013

 

Sincere thanks to all who stopped by and especially to our repeat customers.  Thanks for helping to support our farm and our dream!

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Countdown to SVFF

Only 11 days to the Shenandoah Valley Fiber Festival.  We are excited for this years event.  There will be more vendors, more food options, and hopefully, excellent weather!  Stop by our booth to explore the wools we have gotten in this year.  Fall weather inspires us to start warm projects, and this is a perfect time to pick up yarns.  Here are some fun colors for Fall.

Monet Rowan

Meduseld Store Back On-Line

Ok – So it took me longer than I said to get the Store open again, and I do apologize.  I have done some inventory based on some of the items sold or given away at our Open House.  You will also find some other changes – LOWER PRICES.

maple yarn

Yes, for the next month until the Shenandoah Valley Fiber Festival September 28 and 29, I am lowering the prices on many of the yarns to about cost.  You will find that several of the skeins are now reduced a dollar or more each!  Some of the yarns were already so close to cost that I was not able to drop them further.

Please share word about Meduseld’s natural wool and alpaca yarns!  Buying locally and supporting your local farms helps to keep the U.S. economy strong.  Buying natural fibers is better for your health and better for the planet.  It’s good all around.

Honey reserves are not as high as last year, and we are all but out of maple syrup – there are only six bottles left.  We will not be selling any at this years’ Fiber Festival.  So if you have a sweet tooth this would be a good time to purchase honey and syrup before it’s all gone.

For more information don’t hesitate to email!

Gratefully, Patricia

New Romney Fingerling Yarn Colors

Meduseld has added new colors to its high-sheen Romney fingering/Lace yarn.  They are sold in pairs of 500 yards, 5.5 oz for $25.00.  These vibrant colors called Royal, Full Moon and Titian are perfect for projects going into the fall.  They are in Meduseld’s Store.

Vibrant ROmney Fingerling/Lace yarn

Meduseld Working Conditions

In light of the growing trend for fuller disclosure by retailers and suppliers for more information about the source of their products, the New York Times has written an article describing the clothing and textile manufacturers’ efforts to reveal  more information on how their textiles are grown and manufactured. 

As a result, we here at Meduseld decided that consumers may be interested in the working conditions of our wool producers.  In the following pictures, we will provide a brief tour of the “factory” including their living conditions, work environment, and “fair trade” compensation. 

 Meduseld’s wool producers have two different structures for protection from the elements as well as shade in the heat of the summer.   The larger building was brilliantly created to have a split level plan, which allows for air to circulate to the upper levels and provides very tall ceilings in the stalls.  This design keeps contact with flies at a minimum, and since heat rises, the wool producers enjoy the cool earth floor in the summer.   This is when sheep need protection the most.  In the winter their wool and lanolin ensure comfy warmth.  In the summer, the shorn sheep could hardly otherwise escape the heat.

 crew

Their work environment includes several pastures that they are rotated through.They enjoy diverse grasses and forbes and some of the pastures afford tree cover and shrubs to exfoliate.  They particularly like the “mountain olives,” which they devour like candy.   This is good news, since the Mountain Olive, also called “Autumn Olive” is an invasive species from Asia that is destroying pastures throughout Virginia and West Virginia.  It was intitally recommended by several government agencies for reclaiming land, but now we know better. 

mountain olive

 

It has been difficult to estimate the actual time that they get off for breaks and meals, since most of their day is actually spent eating.   Not limited by 15 minute intervals for breaks, they pretty much plop (is that a word?) down where ever is convenient to process their cud.  Is that technically work or pleasure?  Hard to decide.

 crew taking break

Conditions include full board and meals, full health coverage, and free haircuts every spring.  They don’t even have to pick up after themselves.  Not bad.

Meduseld Lace-weight Yarn Back-in-Stock!

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Meduseld’s lace-weight yarn is back in stock in our store!

This is the beautiful, high-sheen yarn that has been shown in projects on these pages and on Ravelry.   This yarn is ideal for making lace shawls and scarves.  It makes stunning knitted Estonian lace work, and yields a lace fabric with shine and drape. 

Estonian Shawl - Kate

 

Lace Shawl Romney Fingering II

It is also delightful made into crochet lace.  Here it has been used in a pineapple pattern to create a shawl that is diaphanous and catches every breeze, despite being bordered with glass beads.  This yarn would be ideal for making bridal shawls.

Lace Shawl

Lace Shawl

 Meduseld Lace Shawl

Romney yarn holds dye beautifully.  These two-ply skeins are 250 yards  and are $13.00 each.  Each skein weighs approximately 2.9 ozFor bulk purchases, please contact Meduseld directly.